Monday, 14 August 2017

CXXXV. Woodland Creatures

The second misshapen deer for Monstrous Births scenarios. This one has slightly different deformities than the first - most obviously the long muzzle and tusks that make it somewhat boar-like. I gave it some chaotically growing antlers. The mess with the limbs is quite familiar, though. I think they will all end up with creative number, placement and size of legs... I'm going for five, so that's three more to go.
 
 
 
 
 
The two finished deer, side by side.
The conversion was very like the first - Citadel deer and horse parts plus cheap plastic toy limbs and putty.

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After some dabbling with modelling shield designs, I've made an attempt to sculpt an entire humanoid figure from scratch. This is the result:

The sculpt has an old-school vibe. I reckoned this sort of style would be easier to work in, for a beginner. One step at a time... I'll make a scenic base for him soon so that he gets a proper frame.
I layered green stuff over a wire armature. Since it's a monster I didn't pay too much attention to size - he ended up 38mm tall, which would not do for a human at 28-35mm scale.
I had most fun with the face, of course.
This is the finished sculpt. I learned a few things and got some useful practice. On the next attempt I will try to make the head and hands smaller in proportion to the body. And I need to be more patient when rendering the fur texture, there are parts that look quite untidy. But I am very happy with this first try, which motivates me to take it further with the subsequent ones. I made a mould of the shield so that I can convert a few more variants. On this shield I tried out a hybrid mixture of green stuff and Milliput - it was better for that particular job than either one of the putties pure.
I'd made a Wodewose figure before (can't believe it was an entire year ago...). Now that I look at it, it's not that good. There are some problems with the posture as well as anatomy. I can see it getting scrapped, as soon as I manage to scratch-build a better one.

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I got an idea for a new illustrated poker deck, this time with much more elaborate artwork. I don't have time to get into that project properly for now, so I think it will stay on only this one card for a while. I'll just leave it here as a teaser.

The XIII of Blood.

13 comments:

  1. Love your sculpted piece! Maybe the proportions are "wrong", as you say, but that gives it a certain naivé quality that fits this sculpt well, in my opinion -- perfect for a fairy-tale, human-like monster protagonist.
    Concerning your monstrous deer, love it!
    And as far as the illustration is concerned, love your style and could see myself playing poker with those cards (poker is one of those card-games I never play ;)).
    All in all, great work!

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  2. Your creativity and skill knows no bounds Ana. Way cool :)

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  3. Those deers are so disturbing! The subtle understated mutations hit home way harder than the usual gaping mouths and tentacles.
    How'd you learn to sculpt?

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    1. Thanks! I agree. Over-the-top approach has its own place, but I feel it is way overused these days.

      Sculpting - it was just me taking my converting a step further. In years of modelling parts of minis for conversions, I gradually figured out some things. I'm not yet competent enough at it to say I know how to sculpt, but I am not too far either. I'm happy with my progress, I must admit.

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    2. Yeah, I feel as though the over-the-top mega body horror style mutations should be reserved for only special cases.
      It's going very well! Keep up the good work :)

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  4. I think the original Wode was rather charming myself, though this one has more class and seems more "fun".

    The strange deer has elements of a muntjac about it, though their teeth face downward like a predator's. I like it though, I think if all five of these end up so chaotic they'll be some of the my favourite pieces you've done for this project.

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